Source; Wenatchee Valley Museum and Cultural Center
CLICK ON A PHOTO TO ENLARGE
Preflight preparations for the Pacific
crossing in Japan.
Clyde Pangborn torques the prop
while Hugh Herndon and an unknown
helper hold tight.
Although under house arrest the
determined Americans were allowed to
work on there aircraft to prepare for
the longest flight ever attempted.
Hugh pulls the prop threw winding the
starting system. There was no electric
start they would wind it up and pull a
lever from the cock pit to engage. The
down side of this system was no
re-start once airborne unless enough
speed to windmill the prop was
accomplished.
Clyde left and Hugh right pose for a
picture. Notice the newly installed
Chin fuel tank added for the Pacific
attempt.
A new set of 18 Champion spark
plugs are installed as well two per
cylinder.
Miss Veedol rests on her ramp built by
the Japanese on Sabishiro beach. The
wood ramp will help get her started
down the 8,000 foot beach for take off.
A cover is protecting the engine from
sand, as men look for any small debre
that could compromise the attempt.
Clyde gives the Miss Veedol a run up
to check systems while Hugh takes a
break.
The general public in Japan
thought highly of the fliers. The
government however was a little
less receptive.
Preparations on Sabishiro beach
before the Trans-Pacific flight.
A view from a previous stop during the
around the World trip shows a
noticeable difference prior to the chin
fuel tank being installed in Japan.
Moments before take off on Sabishiro
beach. The ramp was built to carry the
plane over the soft sand before finding
smooth water soaked sand which was
firm and 8,000 feet long.
A close up view of the system used to drop the
landing gear in flight. The idea engineered by the
fliers was to gain range with less drag. The wheels
did drop as planned but Clyde had to climb out on
the wing struts to jar loose and drop the landing
gear struts at 14,000 feet over the Pacific.
People look in awe at the plane that
was in Japan two days earlier now sits
in East Wenatchee Washington U.S.A.
County police and Highway patrolman
stand guard as evening sets the day of
the landing in Wenatchee. Fear of
souvenir hunters that could destroy
the plane was very real.
A promotional picture before the round
the world trip.
Landing site Fancher Field in
East Wenatchee Washington.

PHOTOGRAPHS DURING 1931 AROUND THE WORLD FLIGHT
Spirit of Wenatchee